DIGGING IN FOR WINTER

14 10 2013

this post was written by Martin with some input from Cindy

For quite a while over the Spring and Summer, we experienced an outpouring of help from friends and neighbors as we coped with our house fire.  After a couple of mammoth work days that saw the removal of almost all the burned-out structure and the erection of new walls for new rooms in the remaining portion of the house, things quieted down.  These days, when we encounter people we haven’t seen for a while, we are often asked, “are you in your new house yet?”

The answer is, “no,” and, depending on how much time and attention our friends have available at the moment, we fill them in on more or less of the details.  In an effort to bring everybody (or at least everybody who reads this blog) up to date at once,  here is, as my Jewish grandparents would say, “the whole megillah.”  This post is long on wonkish details and a bit short in the “philosophy” department, but then, our true philosophy expresses itself in the details of our lives, so this is, in its own way, a “deep green perspective.”  “All politics is local,” as they say, Green politics especially, and it doesn’t get any more local than building your own home in accordance with your ideals. Read the rest of this entry »





NEXT NASHVILLE–NOT

17 06 2013

Back before the fire, I was planning to closely follow, and possibly participate in, the series of  “Nashville Next” colloquiums that the city held to discuss what Nashville will become in the near to mid-term future.  What with all the upheaval in my own life, I have had to curtail my own grand plans, and so far have seen only one”Nashville Next” presentation, courtesy of the video of it posted online. I was not impressed. If this is the quality of advice our civic leadership is getting, they are taking us down the wrong path, one that will lead us hung up and hung out to dry.

The speaker was Amy Liu, a “senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and co-founder and co-director of the Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program,” according to Metro’s website.  Right off the bat, it was obvious that Ms. Liu worships at the altar of “growth.” Growth is the problem, not the solution. We  have already overshot the planet’s ability to support us in the style to which we have become accustomed.

Read the rest of this entry »





FRACK WHORES, FASCISTS, AND FOOLS

24 03 2013

Mothers of Invention: Brown Shoes Don’t Make It

Mothers of Invention:  Thirteen (from “You Can’t Say That On Stage Anymore, Vol. 6–not available on the net, sorry!)

Mothers of Invention:  Jesus Thinks You’re a Jerk (from “Broadway the Hard Way,” ditto)

As I promised a couple of weeks ago, I did indeed turn out for the anti-fracking demonstration, and the accompanying hearing, at Legislative Plaza, last Friday.  The best thing I can say about it is that it was great to see old friends and new, young faces.  It’s good to feel that this movement is being passed on, even if that’s accompanied by the distinct sensation that it’s being pissed on, as well.

Nature

The hearing was definitely a pisser.  Numerous people called the fracking decision into question on all the obvious grounds–conflict of interest, failure to take into account the value of an unspoiled natural environment, and the dubiousness of the alleged benefits that fracking brings to communities.  Channel 5, bless their hearts, did a background investigation that uncovered the fact that making money, not doing studies, is UT’s primary motivation in opening their forest research center to fracking.  It won’t be much good for forestry studies after the frackers are done with it!  Some members of the State Building Commission even raised the all-important question, “what happens if we get a few years into this and discover that it’s a really bad idea?”

“Trust us,” UT’s representative said, just what BP’s people said when they started deep water drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, just like what Exxon’s representatives said before the Exxon Valdez ran aground, just what Shell said when they attempted to moor an offshore drilling rig in the Arctic Ocean last year.

Here’s quotes from some of the emails Channel 5 uncovered: Read the rest of this entry »





O COME ALL YE FAITHFUL

10 03 2013

I have been writing this blog and doing this radio show now for nearly eight years.  I have devoted about a quarter of my time to it every month, and many things around our homestead have not happened because I have been keeping faith with this blog, my radio program, and the Green Party of Tennessee.

More on the Green Party in a little bit.  My blog has had, according to WordPress, nearly 47,000 visitors in these eight years, but, on the other hand, my spam protector tells me that it has protected me from 36,000 spam posts, meaning, as I understand it, that only about a quarter of my readers are actually on site to read, with the balance–that’s fifteen out of an average of twenty a day–only here to peddle fake Viagra, knockoff watches and handbags, and other detritus of our consumer-driven culture.  I don’t understand where the payoff for these people comes from.  Nobody I know takes them seriously.  It would certainly save a lot of human and electric energy, not to mention bandwidth, if such nonsense could be eliminated.   But I digress, as I so often do.  One thought leads to another, in an endless stream.

Here’s the point.  I have spent about as much time as I can trying to wake people and point out to them that the building is burning, and they/we need to either fight the fire or get out of the building, or both.  It’s time for me to quit talking about taking action, and actually take action myself.  Not to follow my instincts on this would be co-dependent, I think.  I have been there, and done that, and don’t care to dwell there any more.

So, I am looking for someone else in the Nashville area who would like to do this show–I’ve had a few nibbles, but no firm bites yet.  John and Beth can’t do it all themselves, and would like to cut back on their involvement as well.  If nobody wants to take it from our hands, “The Green Hour” will slip into the dustbin of radio history.  I am thinking that I may repurpose the “Deep Green Perspective” blog as an autobiography, since I think my whole life has been lived, in effect, from a “deep green perspective,” and I’d like to tell my story while I still remember most of it.  Anyway, if you’d like to play radio host, get in touch. Read the rest of this entry »





CAN WE TALK?

9 02 2013

opening music:

Richard and Mimi Farina, “Sell-out Agitation Waltz

Bob Dylan, “A Hard Rain’s Gonna Fall

Robbie Basho, “Dravidian Sunday

The Beatles, “Within You/Without You”

Pity Tennessee’s “progressive Democrats.”  They just can’t get no respect, nor satisfaction either.  The old guard, the “blue dogs,” just won’t stand for it.  The progressives reached their high water mark with the election of Chip Forrester as TNDP chairman in 2009, but Forrester’s tenure was undermined by two factors:  the old guard conservative Dems withheld funding, and the Democrat-dominated State Legislature had ignored activists’ concerns and agreed to go along with the Republicans’ request to defer implementation of the Tennessee Voter Confidence Act until after the 2008 election.  2008 was supposed to be the last year Tennesseans voted on easily hackable electronic voting machines; but, mirabile dictu, the Republicans scored upset victory after upset victory, and the first thing the newly Republican state legislature did was repeal the Tennessee Voter Confidence Act, which had passed nearly unanimously.  Yeah, they were for it before they were against it.  While the cover story that has been floated to explain this is that Barack Obama’s candidacy cast a pall over the electability of Democrats in this state, the circumstances are highly suspicious.  As Joe Stalin is said to have said, “It’s not who votes that counts, it’s who counts the votes that counts.”  But that’s not what I’m here to talk about tonight.

In spite of a concerted effort by the state’s urban Democrats, the good-old-boy network prevailed, and the urbanists’ candidate, Dave Garrison, who was thought to be a shoe-in, was defeated by Roy Herron, an anti-abortion, anti-union, A+ NRA-rated member of the “West Tennessee Mafia.”  Tennessee’s liberals and progressives have been relegated to the back of the bus again.  The blue dogs may not be electable, but they still know how to hog the manger.

I would like to offer the state’s progressive Democrats a creative solution to their dilemma: Let the blue dogs have their party.  Go Green.  Read the rest of this entry »





COAL KILLS

9 02 2013

CORRECTION:  The opening power point presentation was given by Dodd Galbreath, not “Dodd Lockwood.”  My bad!

On Thursday night, I went to the Sierra Club’s “peoples’ hearing” on TVA’s proposal to spend a billion dollars on scrubbers for the stacks of its Gallatin, Tennessee, coal plant.  The meeting, along with a couple of other recent news items, was a pleasant, uplifting surprise.  All too often, public meetings and the news alike leave me with a hollow feeling closely associated with how it feels to be heading down a roller coaster curve that I know, just know, is going to make me toss my lunch.  But not this time.

First, the facts of the matter, to the best of this admittedly biased reporter’s ability to state them.  TVA’s Gallatin coal plant, just upriver (and usually upwind) from Nashville, is over fifty years old.  It consumes 9 to 12,000 tons of coal a day to supply electricity to 300,000 homes  (that’s 80 pounds of coal per home per day), and emits about 750,000 tons of CO2 per year to do that–that’s two and a half tons of CO2 per household, anda total of about 23,500 tons of sulfur dioxide, as well as large quantities of mercury, lead and other heavy metals and radioactive elements.  The EPA has ruled that all coal plants must install scrubbers to remove the sulfur dioxide, etc., or close down.  The  “coal ash” that results from the scrubbing process will, apparently, be stored in large piles and containment ponds on the banks of the Cumberland River, just like the piles and ponds next to the Clinch River near Kingston Tennessee.   (Remember what happened there?) and at every other coal-fired power plant in the country, because nobody’s figured out any safe use for all this highly toxic material.  (oops, sorry, I’m editorializing! ….well, that  IS the fact of the matter.)   Because these ponds and piles are going to take up a lot of room, TVA will have to close down The Cumberland River Aquatic Center, which specializes in growing endangered mussel species (essential for restoring stream health) as well as gar and sturgeon.  TVA has been strongly resistant to any kind of public input into their decision to do all this. Read the rest of this entry »





FARMER’S MARKUP

26 01 2013

There has been a flurry of concern in Nashville lately, in some circles, because the Nashville Farmers’ Market is not meeting its expenses, let alone returning a profit to the city, and so there has been some talk of “privatizing” it, in hopes that somebody will figure out a way to make running the market “profitable.”

This prompts two lines of thought for me.  One relates to the Farmers’ Market in specific, and the other is the much broader subject of government provision of public services being criticized for not being “profitable.”  Let’s look at the second one first, and then examine the specific case of the Nashville Farmers’ Market.

One prime example of a government agency (albeit now a semi-private agency) that is in big trouble because it is not “profitable” is the United States Post Office.  It is ironic to me that many people who style themselves “strict constructionists” also advocate privatization of the post office and criticize it for losing money, because establishment of a postal service is directly authorized by the U.S. Constitution, which says nothing about whether that service needs to turn a profit or not.  Good communication is essential to creating a cohesive political entity, and so “post offices and post roads” were high on our founders’ agenda–we’re talking Article One  of the Constitution here.  The Post Office was not some afterthought. Read the rest of this entry »





TVA WANTS TO MAKE AN ASH OF ITSELF-AGAIN

26 01 2013

In December of 2008, TVA’s Kingston Coal Plant was the site of a disaster, as unusually heavy rains washed away retaining walls and inundated the area downstream from the plant with highly toxic coal ash from “ponds” on the plant site.

Now, TVA wants to set the stage for an even more spectacular disaster.  Instead of polluting the small rural community of Kingston, their new plan puts the city of Nashville at risk.

Their intentions are good–the Gallatin plant they want to “upgrade”  has been listed as one of the most polluting coal plants in the country.  But TVA’s solution–to spend a billion dollars installing “scrubbers” that will remove the pollution from the plant’s exhaust system–will result in tons and tons of toxic waste being stored on the banks of the Cumberland River, upstream from Nashville.  All it will take is a flood like the one we had in 2010, and that coal ash, with its toxic load of mercury, cadmium, arsenic, lead, and more–will be all over Nashville.  Thanks, TVA! Read the rest of this entry »





CUMBERLAND-GREEN RIVER BIOREGIONAL COUNCIL WINTER GATHERING!

13 01 2013

And so, in the end, it still comes back to thinking globally, and acting locally.  And locally, there’s an opportunity coming up for those  of us who think along these lines and live in the Nashville neck of what’s left of the local woods to get together and consider our options.  The winter gathering of the Cumberland-Green River Bioregional Council is coming up next weekend, the 18th through the 20th of  January.  This year’s theme is “Climate Calamity:  Cool It Or Lose It.”  You can read the details on the group’s “Meetup” site.  Just in case you’re not familiar with the term “bioregional,” here’s my shot at a definition:

Bioregionalism” is a word that came into use in the late 1970′s as a signifier of “the new paradigm,” i.e., a holistic way of understanding the human situation and life on Earth in general.  The bioregional view is to see the world as a network of interlocking, interacting biological regions, each defined by a loose combination of common  plant communities and watershed boundaries.

Thus, the “Cumberland-Green River” bioregion encompasses the drainage basins of the Cumberland and Green Rivers, as well as the Highland Rim areas south and west of the Nashville basin, areas drained by the Duck, Buffalo, and Elk Rivers, among others, which flow into the Tennessee River from the north or east as it flows west through northern Alabama and then turns north through central Tennessee.

The gathering will kick off on Friday night with a mixer, a great opportunity to talk, reconnect with old friends, and make new ones–well, that’s the idea for the whole weekend, really.  Read the rest of this entry »





FEELING LIKE CASSANDRA

10 11 2012

One of the most popular archetypes depicted in The Iliad is that of Cassandra, daughter of Priam, the King of Troy, who was gifted by Apollo with the ability to see the future clearly.  She accepted his gift but rejected his advances, and so he added a little something to that gift:  she could forecast the future accurately, but nobody would believe her.  And that, my friends, seems to be the fate of the Green Party.

I said two weeks ago that I would be here tonight, “either crowing or eating crow,” and I’m sad to report that I have a well-baked crow on my plate tonight–and I’m a vegetarian!  Yeow!  Despite the best-financed and organized national Green Party campaign since Ralph Nader ran in 2000, Dr. Stein received only about 400,000 votes nationwide–by far the best Green Party showing since Nader’s 2.8 million total, but far short of our hopes and expectations. Her showing in Tennessee–6500 votes, about 0.26% of the total–was typical of her nationwide showing, which was about 0.3% of the national total.  Well, at least we weren’t  way behind the curve here.  But there are other peculiarities about that total, which I’ll explain a little later.

Martin Pleasant’s Senate campaign was our other statewide race.  We had hoped that the fact that the Democrat Party had renounced their elected candidate would result in a big bounce for Marty, but it was not to be.   Either there are a lot of Tennesseans who think Bob Corker is way too tame, or there are a lot of people who just aren’t paying enough attention to know anything more about who they’re voting for than whether there’s a “D” or an “R” after the person’s name.  “G”?  Does not compute!  Putative Democrat Mark Clayton pulled in 700,000 votes, a hundred thousand of them right here in Davidson County, where he nearly beat Bob Corker, while our man Martin Pleasant only got the attention of about 8,000 voters. Clayton actually won Shelby County. Maybe his strong anti-gay stance resonates with socially conservative African-Americans?  According to the Washington Post, Clayton raised less than $300 for his campaign.  A twentieth of a penny per vote.  I’m jealous.  Bob Tuke, the last “real” Democrat to run a serious Senate campaign in Tennessee, raised around a hundred thousand dollars and only got a few more votes than Clayton.

But hey, the Green Party seems to be everybody’s unwanted stepchild.  The Tennessean left Martin Pleasant out of their voters’ guide.  The Nashville Scene left him out, too, just as, nationally, Dr. Stein got nowhere near the level of attention the mainstream media paid to Ralph Nader.  Can’t let that happen again!

Here in Tennessee, we did a little better on our local races.  Read the rest of this entry »








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