HI, MY NAME IS MARTIN, AND I’M ADDICTED TO HOT SHOWERS

5 06 2013

I have been aware of the looming collapse of our ecosystem for over thirty years now.  In the early 80’s, my friends and I concluded that, at some point, humans would cause the extinction of some species that would later prove to have been vital for our own survival.  We’d heard of the Club of Rome, and thus were also aware of the possibility of peak resources and the “Limits to Growth” that they might dictate.  Nevertheless,it seemed to us that, unchecked, humanity would turn the planet into one vast, and ultimately starving, city.  In the late 80’s and early 90’s, climate change crept into our discourse, but at the time it seemed like something that our great-grandchildren would experience.  Well, we were wrong about that.  Things are happening at an increasing rate of speed, and the rate of increase is increasing, but not in quite the catastrophic way we expected.  Call it the collapse of a thousand cuts.

Some of them are certainly huge, catastrophic cuts, like Hurricanes Sandy or Katrina,  (not to mention the Pacific typhoons that have been devastating Southeast Asia, although we have heard little about them in the USA news bubble), or like the new breed of supersize tornadoes that have been bulldozing the American Middle West.  But every one of those mega-disasters is composed of thousands upon thousands of individual human stories:  homes, businesses, and neighborhoods destroyed, with every family and every person in them trying to find a way to cope and recover, far from the boundaries of their comfort zone.

My wife and I had long felt secure here in our hollow, with hills on all sides that protect us from strong winds, yet elevated enough to avoid flooding.  “No more water, the fire next time,” according to the old spiritual, and so it was for us.  Our home caught fire, possibly due to old, faulty, shoddy-to-begin-with aluminum wiring, an old, cracking, shoddy-to-begin-with chimney, or a gnawing rodent with a taste for insulation, or some combination of those, and substantially burned down on the night of April 16th.  A month and a half later, we are living out of a genuine, certified (albeit privately purchased) FEMA emergency trailer, clearing what’s left of our stuff out of what’s left of the house so it can be torn down and rebuilt, and slogging through the slow process of our suddenly dislocated and disorganized daily life…far from the boundaries of our comfort zone. Read the rest of this entry »








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